France to ban food waste in supermarkets

All large-sized supermarkets will have to sign contracts with a charity group to facilitate food donations [EPA]
All large-sized supermarkets will have to sign contracts with a charity group to facilitate food donations [EPA]

France’s parliament has voted unanimously to ban food waste in big supermarkets, notably by outlawing the destruction of unsold food products.

Under the legislation passed on Thursday, as part of a broader law on energy and the environment, supermarkets will be forced to donate any unsold but still edible food goods to charity or for use as animal feed or farming compost.

All large-sized supermarkets will have to sign contracts with a charity group to facilitate food donations.

“It’s scandalous to see bleach being poured into supermarket dustbins along with edible foods,” Socialist member of parliament Guillaume Garot, who sponsored the bill, said.

At present, some grocery stores are pouring bleach in bins after throwing away food to make it unfit for consumption.

French people throw away between 20 to 30 kilos of food per person per year costing an estimated $13m to $22m annually, according to the AFP news agency.

The government is hoping to slice food waste in half by 2025.

Last month, MPs presented 39 suggestions to the French government to end food waste, among them, that French people take up “le doggy bag”, to cut food waste in restaurants.

The head of the French federation for commerce and distribution, Jacques Creyssel, said it was a mistake for the new law to only target big supermarkets, which he said represent only five percent of total food waste.

Up to one third of all food globally is spoiled or squandered before it is consumed by people, according to the UN.

The waste of about 1.3 billion tons of food each year is causing economic losses of $750bn and significant damage to the environment, a 2013 report stated.

Source: Agencies

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2015/05/france-food-waste-supermarkets-150522070410772.html

Some updates

I haven’t been updating my blog because I was away for the last month! I attended the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change’s (UNFCCC) 10th Conference of Youth (COY10) and 20th Conference of Parties (COP20) held in Lima, Peru. The conferences lasted two weeks and I went on to travel around Latin America for another two weeks.

It’s the holiday season but work is still trickling in at the moment, so I will try my best to write about what has been going on the last four weeks when I have some time to spare. In the mean time, I will be reblogging some articles I wrote about climate change and COY10/COP20. I also have an article that will be published on Farming First soon. Will put up a link when it’s live.😀

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

An interview with Leah Fouchong from Trinidad and Tobago

ECO @ COP

Fighting climate change and other environmental issues can often be a lonely battle. But the Conference of Youth (COY) gives young activists the opportunity to meet with like-minded youths and organisations. It is also a fantastic opportunity to hear about goings-on in the various countries right now.

On the first day of COY, I met Leah Fouchong from Trinidad and Tobago, who is a Geography teacher and a representative of the Caribbean Youth Environmental Network (CYEN). I spoke to her to understand a little about her organisation and the problems her country is facing.

What is your organisation working on at the moment?
We are currently working on the Caribbean Congress, which is a 5-day workshop on climate change called “Water, Climate Change and You(th)” to discuss the post-2015 agenda. The Congress will be held from 15th to 20th December in Trinidad and Tobago.

How has climate change affected your…

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Cycling to reduce emissions

ECO @ COP

Over the last two days, I have been working on a rooftop garden in a school located in Admiralty. The aim of the project is to eventually involve the students of the school in the maintenace of the garden, thereby fostering a sense of responsibility towards the community and raising environmental and food security awareness.

En route to the school, one can see bicycle paths alongside the foot paths. Although not pictured here, I also saw many residents who were fully utilising the bicyle paths.

As I arrived at Admiralty MRT Station, I saw designated bicycle racks installed for the convenience of commuters who would like to continue their journey on the train. This is part of the SMRT’s Park & Ride scheme along with designated car parks conveniently located around selected MRT stations islandwide.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), in 2010 the transport sector was responsible for…

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