La Maison Jaune

Certains d’entre vous savent que j’ai fait du WWOOFing à la Maison Jaune à Quirbajou (Pyrénées audoises) l’été dernier. Créée en 2009 en même temps que notre exploitation agricole, la Maison Jaune à Quirbajou, affiliée au réseau Accueil Paysan depuis 2010 (n°1147) offre un accueil simple et chaleureux aux randonneurs et touristes. Elle dispose actuellement de deux chambres d’hôtes (7 couchages), d’un gîte d’étape (6 couchages) et propose une table paysanne (15 convives maxi).

Malheureusement, maintenant, mes hôtes ont un problème: la poursuite de leur activité d’accueil est suspendue à la vente du gîte qu’ils géraient depuis 4 ans mais qui ne leur appartenait pas.

Les propriétaires leur font un prix d’amis mais ils n’ont vraiment pas les moyens de l’acheter. Donc ils ont une idée de vendre par anticipation des séjours pour réunir la somme nécessaire. Et du coup ils se lancent et vous proposent une souscription qui pourrait vous amener à venir les voir dans les 5 prochaines années à des tarifs préférentiels et les amener, à sortir de la situation difficile dans laquelle ils se trouvent.

Si vous, votre famille ou vos amis envisagez d’une destination pour les vacances d’été, peut-être vous pouvez envisager Quirbajou ! Et peut-être je vais vous y voir aussi. 🙂

Je ne profite pas de cette proposition, mais je veux juste aider mes hôtes et mes amis. Si vous avez besoin de précisions ou si quelque chose vous arrête, n’hésitez pas à les appeler au 04 68 20 18 86 (HR). Merci beaucoup!

La Maison Jaune
8 rue du Dépiquage
11500 QUIRBAJOU
lamaisonjaune.quirbajou@orange.fr

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Please sign this petition

Hi!

I just signed the petition “Stop the formal proceedings against Matthias Urban, WWOOF host, who has been subject to fines imposed by the MSA for having hosted a WWOOFer” on Change.org.

It’s important. Will you sign it too? Here’s the link:

http://www.change.org/petitions/stop-the-formal-proceedings-against-matthias-urban-wwoof-host-who-has-been-subject-to-fines-imposed-by-the-msa-for-having-hosted-a-wwoofer?share_id=btvDMvDaEz&utm_campaign=signature_receipt&utm_medium=email&utm_source=share_petition

Thanks!

Work-life balance

While WWOOFing in the farm, sometimes it’s easy to lose track of time while working in the fields. The church bell rings at noon and at 6pm daily, and that’s our cue to stop work. I’d always remember Stéphane saying, “You can stop when the bell rings. Don’t work for too long.” No one ever said that to me in the corporate world! In fact, most employers expect you to stay past your official working hours. What a contrast!

Stéphane and Françoise also gave me the weekends off, so I could go hiking or visit neighbouring villages. Here are some photos from my hike:

Country living

In July, I spent 2 weeks working in a farm in the south of France. I’ve heard of WWOOF (Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms) and have been toying with the idea for a while. Then I got tired of the meaningless work I was doing, so I quit my job and began my journey of learning about organic living. WWOOF is an exchange. Volunteers provide help and host farms provide lodging, food and plenty of information on how to lead an organic lifestyle.

I start my day by feeding the pigs. The pigs enjoy a lovely platter of kitchen scraps mixed with organic feed that keep them happy and healthy.

Every morning, my host Stéphane and I would milk the goats. It took a while before I got the hang of it and admittedly, I was rather slow at it. Sté[hane could milk 4 goats in the amount of time I take to milk 1!

No one is stressed in the countryside. We chat while working, take long lunch breaks and enjoy wine over homecooked meals. Everyone smiles and says hello. Villagers offer me lift back to the village when they see me walking along the road.

Francoise is an excellent cook. I had so much fun in the kitchen with her. We’d pick fresh vegetables and herbs from their garden and she’d let me smell every herb before we added them. Everything was fresh and tasted much better than supermarket-bought produce.

When I left the farm, I had 4 more weeks of travelling ahead of it. There was excitement, of course, but I left with a heavy heart. After years or searching, I found the exact lifestyle I wanted. But I knew there’s a lot of work to be done before I can have any of this. It’s a learning process, and a very long one. But I’m not giving up and I’m bring these lessons home with me.